Stuff I’ve been reading recently – #6

Digital Minimalism: On Living Better with Less Technology
| by Cal Newport

The urge to pick up our phones every few minutes has become a nervous twitch that shatters our time into shards too small to be present. Our addiction to tech leaves us feeling exhausted and overwhelmed. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

In this timely book, professor Cal Newport shows us how to pair back digital distractions and live better with less technology.

Introducing us to digital minimalists — the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones or obsessively document everything they eat — Newport reveals how to live more intentionally in our tech-saturated world.

By following a thirty-day ‘digital declutter’ process, you’ll learn to:

– Rethink your relationship with social media.
– Prioritize ‘high bandwidth’ conversations over low-quality text chains.
– Rediscover the pleasures of the offline world.

Take back control from your devices and become a digital minimalist.

Lifespan: Why We Age – and Why We Don’t Have To
| by David A. Sinclair

It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that ageing is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about ageing is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan?

In this groundbreaking book, Dr David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable.”

This book takes us to the frontlines of research many from Dr David Sinclair’s own lab at Harvard—that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, ageing. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes, the descendants of an ancient genetic survival circuit that is both the cause of ageing and the key to reversing it.

Interpreter of Maladies
| by Jhumpa Lahiri

Pulitzer-winning, scintillating studies in yearning and exile from a Bengali Bostonian woman of immense promise.

One couple exchange unprecedented confessions during nightly blackouts in their Boston apartment as they struggle to cope with a heartbreaking loss; a student arrives in new lodgings in a mystifying new land and, while he awaits the arrival of his arranged-marriage wife from Bengal, he finds his first bearings with the aid of the curious evening rituals that his centenarian landlady orchestrates; a schoolboy looks on while his childminder finds that the smallest dislocation can unbalance her new American life all too easily and send her spiralling into nostalgia for her homeland…

Jhumpa Lahiri’s prose is beautifully measured, subtle and sober, and she is a writer who leaves a lot unsaid, but this work is rich in observational detail, evocative of the yearnings of the exile (mostly Indians in Boston), and full of emotional pull and reverberation.

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